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October 8, 2020 is the National Depression Screening Day. Depression is a serious mental health problem that can affect anyone. If you have never been diagnosed with clinical depression or known of a family member with depression, it may be difficult to recognize the symptoms. Let’s discuss steps for depression awareness.

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, when more people have been alone, stressed, and isolated than ever before, raising awareness about depression is very important. In these scenarios, it is also crucial to encourage people to get screened for depression and get help.

Before we talk about where you or someone you know can find help for depression, it’s critical to get a better understanding of mental health issues as well as destigmatize them.

Don’t take it personally

Depression isn’t something one can just snap out of. It’s a serious mental health problem that drains the person of all their motivation, happiness, optimism, and hope. It also makes it difficult for people to connect with their family and friends on a deep emotional level.

One of the most common symptoms of depression awareness is social withdrawal. This also makes the person feel like not many people care about their state of health. If you reach out to a person suffering from depression, they may seem disinterested in talking with you. Moreover, many depressed people also tend to lash out or say hurtful things.

The idea here is to understand that these things shouldn’t be taken personally. The person is simply trying to cope with the chemical imbalance that depression causes. Taking it personally and distancing yourself from your loved one will further complicate things for them.

It is not a social stigma or a taboo

Since this is a mental health issue, people tend to try to minimize the severity or avoid the topic all together. While a physical injury is considered a high priority in receiving medical care, society tends to feel that mental problems should be kept quiet.

When you dismiss their feelings, you send a message that their mental health issues are shameful or not legitimate. If you continue to avoid or not address the matter, the problem won’t go away and may even worsen.

There is nothing shameful about mental health issues. Just like one shouldn’t be ashamed of heart disease or diabetes, one shouldn’t stigmatize depression either. Ensure that you offer your unconditional love and support to a person with depression and encourage them to seek professional help.

There is nothing shameful about mental health issues.

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Seek help and support

For people suffering from depression, it’s very important to understand that it won’t go away on its own. It’s very important to recognize your symptoms and seek help, depression awareness often lacks. If you are concerned about having depression, here are the symptoms you can look out for to determine if you should get screened for it or not.

  • Distance from loved ones
  • Social withdrawal
  • Lack of interest in activities
  • Sleeping too much
  • Sleeping too little
  • Not able to sleep at all
  • Irregular appetite
  • Lack of hygiene
  • Suicidal thoughts

Getting yourself screened for depression can be very helpful for finding the treatment you need. If you are only suffering mild symptoms, receiving help sooner can assist in faster recovery. When you seek help for depression, you take a step closer towards a motivated and happier life.

Receiving treatment can help you get closer to your loved ones, become motivated about your career, and take up opportunities for socializing actively. Also, if you have a friend or family member who might be showing these symptoms, gently recommend they get screened for depression.

Important links and sources for depression screening

If you are looking for an online depression screening test, try Mental Health America. You can also try the one by the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. While these can be good resources to determine your mental health state, these online assessments cannot be considered as diagnostic tools.

This is why you need the help of a mental health professional/therapist. You can look for one in your area on the American Psychiatry Association Find a Psychiatrist Page.

There are options for online sessions or in-person sessions. Go with what’s more comfortable for you. The National Institute of Mental Health also provides you information on clinical trials for depression in your area.

If you believe talking to other people going through the same issue as you can help, finding a support group can be beneficial. You can look for a support group on the ADAA website. You can also look for support, hope, and motivation on Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance.

Lastly, if you are having suicidal thoughts or thoughts of causing harm to yourself, please seek immediate help. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24/7 to provide support and help whenever you need it. Just call 1-800-273-8255.

Live a happy, motivated, and fulfilling life

Life comes with its ups and downs. As we chase happiness, we must also learn to safeguard ourselves against periods of sadness and difficulty. Only then can we provide ourselves with the right resources to mend our mental health.

We understand how tough and unpredictable life can be. You never know what issues you or your loved ones will face over time or all of the sudden. This is why life insurance is so important. Having the right policy in place will give you the peace of mind knowing your family will be financially secure.

Ready to see what you’d pay for life insurance? Start with a free quote today.

To learn more about how depression, anxiety and mental health may affect buying life insurance, here are several articles to help.

 

About the writer

Headshot of Natasha Cornelius, a life insurance writer, for Quotacy, Inc.

Greg Lewerer

Director of Creative Strategy

Greg is Quotacy’s Director of Creative Strategy. He has an eclectic past from working on movie scripts to creating ad campaigns for major brands. His love of creative solutions drove him to strategy, and he now uses his powers to help families protect their loved ones. Outside of work, Greg spends his time off the grid hunting, fishing, camping, biking, hiking, and walking his dogs.